Monday, October 03, 2005

Nursery of Stars


Those stars seem so far. Those stars that I speak of reaching for. What do I know about them? How curious have I been? Scientific curiosity won’t satisfy me. I don’t want their science. I want to know the stars intimately. I want to understand their ways as a celestial navigator crossing the ocean. Something deep within me yearns for a personal connection.

In my déjà vu days, we talked about a silver thread that ties together the universe. Did I not believe what I was saying? Or is it that I got distracted by the earthly stuff of living? I want the silver thread again so that the universe can pull me in. Then I could become friends with the stars.

I have breathed in a sunrise and sat inside a sunset. I have made peace with dusk and seen both sides of dawn. I’ve had hour-long conversations with Orion while staring at his belt. He’s probably wondering where I’ve gone. Now I live where city lights unblinkingly push stars aside. I’ve no way of telling Orion where I am.

Stars are born. They grow. They collapse and die. Hundreds are born in star nurseries—their birth long and awe-inspiring much like our very own.

But that’s certain anthropomorphism—a human attempt to describe stars through our experience. Or is it? The stories of the constellations still live in our traditions. We use the word stars to speak of heroes and our legends. We sing about the stars and hope they will align for us. Stars and people are made of the same cosmic dust.

What if . . .
that last fact has greater meaning?
our fascination with the stars is coded in the stardust that we are?
stars and people are genuinely related through stardust?
stars can think, dream, and yearn for a personal connection?
there is a deeper reason why we stand reaching for the stars?

Those questions change how I see this photo named Nursery of Stars.


—me strauss Letting me be
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Celestial navigation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

How Stars Are Born-Star Formation

Curious About Astronomy? Stars

24 comments:

Janus said...

I love looking at the stars myself, I go out to my parent's place and sit in my boat in the middle of the lake and watch the stars for hours...and then wish I wore OFF usually.

ME Strauss said...

Hi Janus,
I think that part of the reason that it si there and so big is that it is meant to be looked at. There is comfort in knowing we're all under the ssame sky.

I bet you had some fabulous thought time in that boat and that you did need a lot of relief from stress when you were there.

smiles,
Liz

Tanda said...

I enjoyed seeing the wheels turning in your head as I read that post. Perhaps there is some sort of connection between people and the stars. You made that connection seem so natural and inviting.

ME Strauss said...

Hi Tanda
I was just thinking about you. Thank you. I bet you're pretty good at figuring out exactly which direction the wheels in my head are going. Thanks too for the pointed feedback.

Smiles,
Liz

Jennifer said...

Imagine the universe as their playground. What a big vast amazing space to go play in. Hide and seek must be an adventure and a half.

CAn you imagine playful stars, dancing to a tune they hear that we can only image.

They grow just like us. They're born, they grow, they get old, they die. They entertain, they hide, they live.

I'd love to go dance with them. It has to be the most beautiful and awe-inspiring sight one could have.

I had the most amazing opportunity a little over a year ago at Kitt Peak in AZ. I got to see the stars thru these HUGE telescopes. Oh it was amazing. Even without the the telescopes just standing on the top of the 'mountain' the sky was clearing and more filled with stars than I've ever seen in my life.

ME Strauss said...

Jennifer,
It's so great to hear so much energy and imagination. I hope you'll write down something of what you're imagining. It sounds as amazing to me. I think I'd like to go with you.
smiles
Liz

Lance said...

I recently heard a two part presentation about our place in the universe and how small we are and how big the universe is, related to the distance in light years, and showcasing photos from the Hubbel telescope. It was very impressive. I like to listen to scientists explain how the universe was created. It is so complex and has so vast of a scope we (as the collective brain power on earth) are humbled by the stars. Great photo as well. I am smiling as I shared your interest for the skies this morning as I witnessed the most impressive comet at 32 000 feet out my front office window.

ME Strauss said...

Hi Lance,
It's a good thing when a writer hears that she made someone smile. Thank you.

The sky is nothing less than awe-inspiring. It's one of the things I think worth getting up for.

smiles,
Liz

Jennifer said...

I took your advice...actually it's just off the top of my head during what was suppose to be a 5 min. break (turned into 15min. -- don't tell anyone!!)

Come dance!

Ned said...

This is so strange, perhaps there is a connection. I had thoughts for a poem in my head last night but being tired, just rehearsed them in my head as I went to sleep. Got up 4am and wrote it. Went to work. Came home, worked on it a bit and just posted it.

I think I had a star connection...

Bluesky_Liz said...

This reminds me of something I heard from a documentary long ago ( Ican't remember where) that "We are made from the stuff of stars". Maybe that's why looking up at stars give us a sense of wonder and something more.

ME Strauss said...

Jennifer,
Thank you for inviting to your dance. It was wonderful and amazing.
smiles,
Liz

ME Strauss said...

Ned,
That is so amazing when you consider that this morning early I ended up on your site at the place where I made my first comment to you.

Stardust in action.
Liz

ME Strauss said...

Hi Liz,
Welcome again,
Yes we are made of the same stuff.

That is what I was thinking of when I wrote this.

smiles,
Liz

easywriter said...

I love to get lost among the stars at night. This was such a pleasure to read. Don't want to know the science either, just look at them and wonder.

ME Strauss said...

Easy,
You and I agree on so many things.

If fact, I'm starting to think that all of us should pick a night to go out and stare up at the stars.

smiles,
Liz

easywriter said...

Just name the day. I'll be there, or at least, looking up at the same sky on the very same night. :o)

Ned said...

For Blueskytavern Liz:
That was Carl Sagan's series "Cosmos". It was interesting stuff, too bad for a brilliant man he was also a looney tune, but still, brilliant in his field and a thinker (although when he said things like "the trees are our cousins" I did wonder about him a bit).

ME Strauss said...

Easy, it may be getting too late to do it outside up here, but I could look out the window.

ME Strauss said...

Yes, Ned,
I remember both the series and the billions and billions of stars Man. He was a little looney. Does that mean you'll be quoting him soon?:)
Liz

Ned said...

Liz:

I did actually quote him about the trees, lol. Didn't mean to. I think his most interesting work was "Dragons of Eden". The man had a great mind but he was, like all geniuses, slightly mad.

ME Strauss said...

Ned,
I'm starting to think you spend your non-poetry hours communing with the spirits of dead geniuses so that you can bring quotes to this blog. :)

Bluesky_Liz said...

Ned, that must be it. Cosmos. I used to have that book too.

ME Strauss said...

Liz and Ned,
So little did we know that we three met out there in Cosmos.
There's something to that I think.